3d Max Character

3d Max Character

3d Max Character

Over the last 10 to 15 years 3D visualisation and green-screen technology has become a necessity in advertising. It has become so prevalent, that it is rare to see an ad these days without the use of 3D visualisation or green-screen technology.

This technology provides many advantages, apart from the obvious ‘visual eye-candy’ that green-screen and 3D provide, the technology also solves many production problems, for example, any logistical issues involved in the shoot e.g. locations become defunct as 3D and green-screen technology can place the actors in any location imaginable – digitally, On the moon, in a jungle, on a beach etc. The producer can be on one side of the globe while the production team can be on another and the work can be shared via ftp technology.

3d Max Character

3d Max Character

3d Max Character

Green-screen technology involves shooting actors in front of an evenly lit green or blue wall or screen, this then allows digital software to remove the green or blue parts from the video and enables an artist to place (or composite) the actors in any situation conceivable. It is rare to see a product advertisement without the use if 3D visualisation, it is used so much because of the distinct advantages it provides. The product can be lit in a way that looks better than real life, it can be animated in so many ways and have countless digital effects incorporated.

3D visualisation has become very popular in advertising, whether it is used to create scenes and backgrounds or the entire ad. Many ad’s now involve 3D characters rather than actors, which are produced in 3D visualisation software like 3D’s Max, Cinema 4 D, or Maya. The method to produce this kind of character work involves firstly designing the characters, then converting them to top, front and side view drawings. Then these drawings are used to model the characters in 3D software. Next the 3D models are textured and then boned and then skinned. The character needs bones which deform the ‘mesh’ in a realistic way, the bones are put within the character mesh and then the mesh is skinned, this means when the bones move the mesh deforms with it appropriately. Once this is done the character can be animated using the bones. After the scene is animated and all necessary elements are added, the scene is lit and the final scene is ‘rendered’, this means that each frame is created with the lighting and materials effecting the scene so it looks polished and realistic.

By Paul Doherty
Article Source: ezinearticles.com